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Clinical Validity, Understandability, and Actionability of Online Cardiovascular Disease Risk Calculators: Systematic Review

Clinical Validity, Understandability, and Actionability of Online Cardiovascular Disease Risk Calculators: Systematic Review

The qualitative descriptions of the risk calculator were used to develop a framework for quantitative data extraction (risk model, risk result, and presence/absence of risk communication formats), after which an individual researcher (MF) conducted the basic

Carissa Bonner, Michael Anthony Fajardo, Samuel Hui, Renee Stubbs, Lyndal Trevena

J Med Internet Res 2018;20(2):e29


Comment on: Clinical Validity, Understandability, and Actionability of Online Cardiovascular Disease Risk Calculators: Systematic Review

Comment on: Clinical Validity, Understandability, and Actionability of Online Cardiovascular Disease Risk Calculators: Systematic Review

I am writing regarding the systematic review about clinical validity, understandability, and actionability of online cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk calculators recently published by Dr Bonner and colleagues [1].

Ivan Sisa

J Med Internet Res 2018;20(3):e10093


Can an Internet-Based Health Risk Assessment Highlight Problems of Heart Disease Risk Factor Awareness? A Cross-Sectional Analysis

Can an Internet-Based Health Risk Assessment Highlight Problems of Heart Disease Risk Factor Awareness? A Cross-Sectional Analysis

Second, it analyzes agreement of self-reported and clinically measured CHD risk factor values according to the Framingham Heart Study’s 10-year CHD risk model [17] to determine if those at higher risk of CHD have a greater understanding of their CHD risk factors

Justin B Dickerson, Catherine J McNeal, Ginger Tsai, Cathleen M Rivera, Matthew Lee Smith, Robert L Ohsfeldt, Marcia G Ory

J Med Internet Res 2014;16(4):e106


On Supplementing “Foot in the Door” Incentives for eHealth Program Engagement

On Supplementing “Foot in the Door” Incentives for eHealth Program Engagement

Rather, it appears that “rewards simply motivated people to get rewards”, an often-cited risk of incentives for health [11].

Marc Steven Mitchell, Guy E Faulkner

J Med Internet Res 2014;16(7):e179