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Citing this Article

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Published on 16.03.15 in Vol 2, No 1 (2015): Jan-Jun

This paper is in the following e-collection/theme issue:

Works citing "Nurses' Perceptions and Practices Toward Clinical Alarms in a Transplant Cardiac Intensive Care Unit: Exploring Key Issues Leading to Alarm Fatigue"

According to Crossref, the following articles are citing this article (DOI 10.2196/humanfactors.4196):

(note that this is only a small subset of citations)

  1. Simpson KR, Lyndon A. False Alarms and Overmonitoring. Journal of Nursing Care Quality 2019;34(1):66
    CrossRef
  2. Ruppel H, Funk M. Nurse–Technology Interactions and Patient Safety. Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America 2018;30(2):203
    CrossRef
  3. Cameron HL, Little B. Nurses' Perceptions and Practices Related to Alarm Management: A Quality Improvement Initiative. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing 2018;49(5):207
    CrossRef
  4. Freysdóttir GR, Björnsdóttir K, Svavarsdóttir MH. Nurses’ use of monitors in patient surveillance: an ethnographic study on a coronary care unit. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing 2018;:147451511881693
    CrossRef
  5. Wung S, Schatz MR. Critical Care Nurses’ Cognitive Ergonomics Related to Medical Device Alarms. Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America 2018;30(2):191
    CrossRef
  6. Wung S, Malone DC, Szalacha L. Sensory Overload and Technology in Critical Care. Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America 2018;30(2):179
    CrossRef
  7. Bower RA, Coad JE, Manning JC, Pengelly TA. A qualitative, exploratory study of nurses’ decision-making when interrupted during medication administration within the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing 2018;44:11
    CrossRef
  8. Vitoux RR, Schuster C, Glover KR. Perceptions of Infusion Pump Alarms. Journal of Infusion Nursing 2018;41(5):309
    CrossRef
  9. Johnson KR, Hagadorn JI, Sink DW. Alarm Safety and Alarm Fatigue. Clinics in Perinatology 2017;44(3):713
    CrossRef
  10. Petersen EM, Costanzo CL. Assessment of Clinical Alarms Influencing Nurses’ Perceptions of Alarm Fatigue. Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing 2017;36(1):36
    CrossRef
  11. Torabizadeh C, Yousefinya A, Zand F, Rakhshan M, Fararooei M. A nurses’ alarm fatigue questionnaire: development and psychometric properties. Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing 2017;31(6):1305
    CrossRef
  12. Sowan AK, Gomez TM, Tarriela AF, Reed CC, Paper BM. Changes in Default Alarm Settings and Standard In-Service are Insufficient to Improve Alarm Fatigue in an Intensive Care Unit: A Pilot Project. JMIR Human Factors 2016;3(1):e1
    CrossRef
  13. Sowan AK, Reed CC, Staggers N. Role of Large Clinical Datasets From Physiologic Monitors in Improving the Safety of Clinical Alarm Systems and Methodological Considerations: A Case From Philips Monitors. JMIR Human Factors 2016;3(2):e24
    CrossRef