JMIR Human Factors

(Re-)designing health care and making health care interventions and technologies usable, safe, and effective

Editor-in-Chief:

Andre Kushniruk BA, MSc, PhD, FACMI, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria, Canada


Impact Factor 2023

JMIR Human Factors (JHF, ISSN 2292-9495; Editor-in-Chief: Prof. Andre Kushniruk) is a multidisciplinary journal with contributions from design experts, medical researchers, engineers, and social scientists.

JMIR Human Factors focuses on understanding how the behaviour and thinking of humans can influence and shape the design of health care interventions and technologies, and how the design can be evaluated and improved to make health care interventions and technologies usable, safe, and effective. This includes usability studies and heuristic evaluations, studies concerning ergonomics and error prevention, design studies for medical devices and healthcare systems/workflows, enhancing teamwork through Human Factors based teamwork training, measuring non-technical skills in staff like leadership, communication, situational awareness and teamwork, and healthcare policies and procedures to reduce errors and increase safety.

JHF aspires to lead health care towards a culture of "usability by design", as well as to a culture of testing, error-prevention and safety, by promoting and publishing reports rigorously evaluating the usability and human factors aspects in health care, as well as encouraging the development and debate on new methods in this emerging field. Possible contributions include usability studies and heuristic evaluations, studies concerning ergonomics and error prevention, design studies for medical devices and healthcare systems/workflows, enhancing teamwork through human factors-based teamwork training, measuring non-technical skills in staff like leadership, communication, situational awareness and teamwork, and healthcare policies and procedures to reduce errors and increase safety. Reviews, viewpoint papers and tutorials are as welcome as original research.

All articles are professionally copyedited and typeset. JMIR Human Factors is indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central, DOAJ, Scopus, PsychINFO, and the Emerging Sources Citation Index (Clarivate).

Recent Articles

Article Thumbnail
General Articles on Human Factors

The use of telemedicine has increased dramatically through the COVID-19 pandemic. Although data are available about patient satisfaction with telemedicine, little is known about immigrant patients’ experience.

|
Article Thumbnail
Theories and Frameworks in Human Factors

The cocreation of eHealth solutions with potential users, or co-design, can help make the solution more acceptable. However, the co-design research approach requires substantial investment, and projects are not always fruitful. Researchers have provided guidelines for the co-design approach, but these are either applicable only in specific situations or not supported by empirical data. Ways to optimize the experience of the co-design process from the point of view of the participants are also missing. Scientific literature in the co-design field generally provides an extrinsic description of the experience of participants in co-design projects.

|
Article Thumbnail
User Needs and Competencies

Emerging technologies, such as artificial intelligence (AI), have the potential to enhance service responsiveness and quality, improve reach to underserved groups, and help address the lack of workforce capacity in health and mental health care. However, little research has been conducted on the acceptability of AI, particularly in mental health and crisis support, and how this may inform the development of responsible and responsive innovation in the area.

|
Article Thumbnail
User-centred Design Case Studies

Although assistive technology for cognition (ATC) has enormous potential to help individuals who have sustained a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) prepare meals safely, no ATC has yet been developed to assist in this activity for this specific population.

|
Article Thumbnail
Design and Usability of Consumer Health Tech and Home Monitoring Devices

Stress can have adverse effects on health and well-being. Informed by laboratory findings that heart rate variability (HRV) decreases in response to an induced stress response, recent efforts to monitor perceived stress in the wild have focused on HRV measured using wearable devices. However, it is not clear that the well-established association between perceived stress and HRV replicates in naturalistic settings without explicit stress inductions and research-grade sensors.

|
Article Thumbnail
Focus Groups and Qualitative Research with Users

Medication discrepancies can lead to adverse drug events and patient harm. Medication reconciliation is a process intended to reduce medication discrepancies. We developed a Secure Messaging for Medication Reconciliation Tool (SMMRT), integrated into a web-based patient portal, to identify and reconcile medication discrepancies during transitions from hospital to home.

|
Article Thumbnail
Design and Usability of Consumer Health Tech and Home Monitoring Devices

Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults, with heavy social and economic burden worldwide. A cost-effective solution is urgently needed to facilitate the identification of individual rehabilitation needs and thereby provide tailored rehabilitations to reduce disability among people who have had a stroke. A novel digital graphic follow-up tool Rehabkompassen has recently been developed to facilitate capturing the multidimensional rehabilitation needs of people who have had a stroke.

|
Article Thumbnail
User-centred Design Case Studies

HIV mobile health (mHealth) interventions often incorporate interactive peer-to-peer features. The user-generated content (UGC) created by these features can offer valuable design insights by revealing what topics and life events are most salient for participants, which can serve as targets for subsequent interventions. However, unstructured, textual UGC can be difficult to analyze. Interpretive thematic analyses can preserve rich narratives and latent themes but are labor-intensive and therefore scale poorly. Natural language processing (NLP) methods scale more readily but often produce only coarse descriptive results. Recent calls to advance the field have emphasized the untapped potential of combined NLP and qualitative analyses toward advancing user attunement in next-generation mHealth.

|
Article Thumbnail
Reviews on Human Factors

The rapid and widespread growth of mobile technologies in low- and middle-income countries can offer groundbreaking ways of disseminating public health interventions. However, gender-based inequalities present a challenge for women in accessing mobile technology. Research has shown that mobile health (mHealth) interventions can affect gender relations in both positive and negative ways; however, few mHealth programs use a gender-sensitive lens when designing, implementing, or analyzing programs.

|
Article Thumbnail
General Articles on Human Factors

New technologies offer opportunities to create a healthy, productive, and capable aging workforce. There is little research from an organizational perspective about how technology can help create a sustainable aging workforce.

|
Article Thumbnail
Design and Usability of Consumer Health Tech and Home Monitoring Devices

Researchers have conducted numerous studies seeking to understand how to improve the implementation of changes in health care organizations, but less focus has been given to applying lessons already learned from implementation science. Finding innovative ways to apply these findings efficiently and consistently will improve current research on implementation strategies and allow organizations utilizing these techniques to make changes more effectively.

|
Article Thumbnail
Theme Issue: Human Factors of the COVID-19 Outbreak

During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and in preparation for future public health crises, it is important to understand the relationship between individuals’ health beliefs, including their trust in various sources of health information, and their engagement in mitigation behaviors.

|

Preprints Open for Peer-Review

We are working in partnership with