JMIR Human Factors

(Re-)designing health care and making health care interventions and technologies usable, safe, and effective.

Editor-in-Chief:

Andre Kushniruk, BA, MSc, PhD, FACMI, School of Health Information Science, University of Victoria, Canada


Impact Factor 2.7

JMIR Human Factors (JHF, ISSN 2292-9495) is a multidisciplinary journal with contributions from design experts, medical researchers, engineers, and social scientists.

In 2023, JMIR Human Factors received an inaugural Journal Impact Factor™ of 2.7 (Source: Journal Citation Reports™ from Clarivate, 2023).

JMIR Human Factors focuses on understanding how the behaviour and thinking of humans can influence and shape the design of health care interventions and technologies, and how the design can be evaluated and improved to make health care interventions and technologies usable, safe, and effective. This includes usability studies and heuristic evaluations, studies concerning ergonomics and error prevention, design studies for medical devices and healthcare systems/workflows, enhancing teamwork through Human Factors based teamwork training, measuring non-technical skills in staff like leadership, communication, situational awareness and teamwork, and healthcare policies and procedures to reduce errors and increase safety.

JHF aspires to lead health care towards a culture of "usability by design", as well as to a culture of testing, error-prevention and safety, by promoting and publishing reports rigorously evaluating the usability and human factors aspects in health care, as well as encouraging the development and debate on new methods in this emerging field. Possible contributions include usability studies and heuristic evaluations, studies concerning ergonomics and error prevention, design studies for medical devices and healthcare systems/workflows, enhancing teamwork through human factors-based teamwork training, measuring non-technical skills in staff like leadership, communication, situational awareness and teamwork, and healthcare policies and procedures to reduce errors and increase safety. Reviews, viewpoint papers and tutorials are as welcome as original research.

All articles are professionally copyedited and typeset.

JMIR Human Factors is indexed in National Library of Medicine (NLM)/MEDLINE, PubMed, PubMed Central, DOAJ, Scopus, Sherpa Romeo, PsychINFO, and the Web of Science (WoS)/ESCI/SCIE.

Recent Articles

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Design and Usability of Consumer Health Tech and Home Monitoring Devices

Early users found Engagement and Visualization to Improve Symptoms in Oncology Care (ENVISION), a web-based application designed to improve home management of hospice patients’ symptoms and support patients’ and family caregivers’ well-being, to be generally useful and easy to use. However, they also raised concerns about potential challenges users with limited technological proficiency might experience.

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Design and Evaluation of Medical Education Materials

Digital interventions are gaining increasing interest due to their structured nature, ready availability, and self-administered capabilities. Perinatal women have expressed a desire for such interventions. In this regard, behavioral activation interventions may be particularly suitable for digital administration.

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Focus Groups and Qualitative Research for Human Factors Research

Although the effects of digital health are receiving wide scientific attention, very little is known about the characteristics of digitally engaged people experiencing homelessness, especially in Central and Eastern Europe. Our previous research revealed a considerable level of internet use in the homeless population of Budapest, Hungary, for general purposes (350/662, 52.9%) and medical purposes (229/664, 34.6%). Moreover, a digitally engaged subgroup was identified (129/662, 19.5%).

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User-centred Design Case Studies

Chronic kidney disease affects 10% of the population worldwide, and the number of patients receiving treatment for end-stage kidney disease is forecasted to increase. Therefore, there is a pressing need for innovative digital solutions that increase the efficiency of care and improve patients’ quality of life. The aim of the eHealth in Home Dialysis project is to create a novel eHealth solution, called eC4Me, to facilitate predialysis and home dialysis care for patients with chronic kidney disease.

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Usability Evaluation Case Studies

Optimal rehabilitation programs for orthopedic joint replacement patients ensure faster return to function, earlier discharge from hospital, and improved patient satisfaction. Digital health interventions show promise as a supporting tool for re-enablement.

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Design and Usability of Consumer Health Tech and Home Monitoring Devices

The emergence of smartphones has sparked a transformation across multiple fields, with health care being one of the most notable due to the advent of mobile health (mHealth) apps. As mHealth apps have gained popularity, there is a need to understand their energy consumption patterns as an integral part of the evolving landscape of health care technologies.

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Design and Usability of Consumer Health Tech and Home Monitoring Devices

Health care lags in digital transformation, despite the potential of technology to improve the well-being of individuals. The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the uptake of technology in health care and increased individuals’ willingness to perform self-management using technology. A web-based service, Directlab Online, provides consumers with direct digital access to diagnostic test packages, which can digitally support the self-management of health.

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Design and Usability of Websites for Special User Groups

Care partners of people with serious illness experience significant challenges and unmet needs during the patient’s treatment period and after their death. Learning from others with shared experiences can be valuable, but opportunities are not consistently available.

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Focus Groups and Qualitative Research for Human Factors Research

More than one-third of older adults (aged ≥65 y) experience falls every year. The prevalent modifiable risk factors for falling are malnutrition and physical inactivity, among others. The involvement of older adults in the prevention of falls can decrease injuries, hospitalizations, and dependency on health care professionals. In this regard, eHealth can support older adults’ self-management through more physical activity and adequate food intake. eHealth must be tailored to older adults’ needs and preferences so that they can reap its full benefits. Therefore, it is necessary to gain insight into the knowledge, skills, and mindset of older adults living at home who are at risk of falls regarding eHealth.

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Design and Evaluation of Patient Education Materials

Cigarette smoking remains one of the leading causes of preventable death worldwide. A worldwide study by the World Health Organization concluded that more than 8 million people die every year from smoking, tobacco consumption, and secondhand smoke. The most effective tobacco cessation programs require personalized human intervention combined with costly pharmaceutical supplementation, making them unaffordable or inaccessible to most tobacco users. Thus, digital interventions offer a promising alternative to these traditional methods. However, the leading smartphone apps available in the market today have either not been studied in a clinical setting or are unable to match the smoking cessation success rates of their expensive offline counterparts. We would like to understand whether QuitSure, a novel smoking cessation app built by Rapidkart Online Private Limited, is able to bridge this efficacy gap and deliver affordable and effective smoking cessation at scale.

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Hermeneutics and Interpretation in Implementation Science

Implementation of remote monitoring solutions and digital alerting tools in health care has historically been challenging, despite the impetus provided by the COVID-19 pandemic. To date, a health systems–based approach to systematically describe barriers and facilitators across multiple domains has not been undertaken.

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Design and Usability of Websites for Special User Groups

In Canada, adults with chronic noncancer pain face a persistent insufficiency of publicly funded resources, with the gold standard multidisciplinary pain treatment facilities unable to meet the high clinical demand. Web-based self-management programs cost-effectively increase access to pain management and can improve several aspects of physical and emotional functioning. Aiming to meet the demand for accessible, fully automated resources for individuals with chronic noncancer pain, we developed a French web- and evidence-based self-management program, Agir pour moi (APM). This program includes pain education and strategies to reduce stress, practice mindfulness, apply pacing, engage in physical activity, identify and manage thinking traps, sleep better, adapt diet, and sustain behavior change.

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